Mormon Culture: Activist and Mormon. Is it possible?

Mormon Culture: Activist and Mormon. Is it possible?

Just so you know, I’m a feminist, and I believe our society needs to do more to treat others equal, including ethnic minorities and members of the LGBTQ+ community. Do you think there’s tension between fighting for the rights of certain groups and being a 

Mormon Culture: Mission Presidents, Room for Interpretation?

Mormon Culture: Mission Presidents, Room for Interpretation?

Sometimes people got along with their mission president and sometimes people didn’t. But a mission president still makes an impact on the missionaries he presides over. Wendy Ulrich, a psychologist who advises the missionary mental health committee, said sometimes clashes between missionaries and mission presidents come about 

Mormon Culture: Unwritten Rules

Mormon Culture: Unwritten Rules

Every culture has some unwritten rules. Often, these are called norms, of which there are two types: folkways and mores (pronunciation). A folkway is “a custom or belief common to members of a society or culture.” And a more is “A set of moral norms or 

Mormon Culture: A Polarized Group?

Mormon Culture: A Polarized Group?

Nowadays, we constantly hear about how polarized politics are. The Republicans will agree with Republicans, even if they don’t agree — for the sake of the party. And Democrats will agree with Democrats, even if they don’t agree — for the sake of the party. 

Mormon Culture: Ministering

Mormon Culture: Ministering

What does it mean to minister? The dictionary definition is “to give aid or service.” What’s interesting to me is that the LDS Church has a whole section of their Provident Living website devoted to “ministering” — which includes topics on abuse help, addiction, caregivers, 

Mormon Culture: #MormonCulture on Twitter

Mormon Culture: #MormonCulture on Twitter

Is “Mormon culture” a bad thing? Before looking into this subject as something to write on, I pretty much only heard the term “Mormon culture” with a negative connotation. Just ask someone how they feel about Mormon culture, and they’ll probably have some pent up angst 

Mormon Culture: Missionary Mental Health Resources

Mormon Culture: Missionary Mental Health Resources

If you’re the parent of a son or daughter going on a mission, you probably worry about their health when they write home saying something is amiss. And if it’s related to mental health, you might not know what resources are available to them. According 

Mormon Culture: “Mormons and Gays” to “Mormon and Gay”

Mormon Culture: “Mormons and Gays” to “Mormon and Gay”

What’s the difference between saying “Mormons and Gays” and “Mormon and Gay”? Actually, quite a lot. It’s a shift from “us” and “them” language to “us” language. In 2012, the LDS church launched a website called Mormons and Gays (this link will take you to the old 

Mormon Culture: “Us” and “Them” Mentality

Mormon Culture: “Us” and “Them” Mentality

Sometimes you’ll hear an “us” and “them” mentality in religious rhetoric; the same is true for Mormon rhetoric. In sociology, there’s a concept of the in-group and the out-group. If you feel you’re part of a group, you are the in-group. Whoever the in-group is “competing” with 

Mormon Culture: Stigmas

Mormon Culture: Stigmas

Let’s talk about people who didn’t serve missions. Is it okay to have a negative reaction towards them because they decided not to serve missions — whether they be female or male? Nope. I’ll never forget a story I heard about a young man who